A Closer Look At The Evolution Of Swimsuits For Women

The idea of swimsuits for women was first introduced to the public around 1687 through bathhouse uniforms that were made out of fine, yellow, stiff canvas. When the Bath Corporation announced their ba...

The idea of swimsuits for women was first introduced to the public around 1687 through bathhouse uniforms that were made out of fine, yellow, stiff canvas. When the Bath Corporation announced their bathing dress code, specifying that no woman would bathe in public within the United Kingdom without a decent shift on their bodies, the idea was soon developed into a norm. Until then, people swam in beaches and pools naked. But as the century pressed on, accounts of a bathing costume made of jackets and petticoats, as well as a one-piece shift or smock were already found in several literatures. By 1907, they became more figure-hugging and revealing, paving the way for how we know them now.

A swimsuit, or swimdress as it was called in the olden days, is a clothing article primarily designed to be worn when engaging in water activities. They have versions for male and females. But it is with the latter that it is most popular. Swimsuits can be worn for leisure or for sports. And today, they can even be utilized for trivial causes like getting a tan or just lazing beside the pool on a sunny summer day.

Swimsuits for women come in a variety of styles which have a direct relation to body coverage. What you choose will depend on your preference. But community standards may also have a slight influence on what you end up putting on. Take Muslim women for example, who are not allowed to show any part of their bodies in public. Their swimdress choice is limited to that of the burqini which covers the whole body and head in the same way as a wetsuit does. They are indeed, less fashionable. But they are functional as far as the definition goes.

Other popular kinds of swimsuits are that of the maillot, bikini, tankini and monokini. For those who are not eager to roast their skin under the sun’s heat, there is that option of wearing rash guards, which are athletic shirts made of spandex and nylon. People engaging in contests, meanwhile, are encouraged to wear competitive swimwear instead which are created from special, low resistance fabric. Unlike ordinary swimsuits for women that have a purely aesthetic purpose, these clothing types actually help reduce skin drag and provide a little thermal protection. They often resemble unitards with their tight fit nature. And they provide more coverage to protect the skin from abrasions and stings. When training, some swimmers and divers purposely wear drag suits as an alternative to competitive gear so they increase the drag sensation. That way, they can build up resistance to waves and endurance.

Whatever you put on, it is important that you observe proper hygiene and maintenance practices since germs, mold and bacteria can grow very quickly on wet surfaces. As much as possiblePsychology Articles, experts recommend that people do not use damp swimwear for long periods of time because this might make them more susceptible to contracting a disease. Females are especially vulnerable to developing vaginal and urinary tract infection.

 

 

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